Congressmen Introduce “IRA Preservation Act of 2019”

Although members of the House of Representatives have officially begun their annual August recess, among bills that have recently been introduced and referred to committee is H.R. 4117, the “IRA Preservation Act of 2019.” Its chief co-sponsors are Reps. Ron Kind (D-WI) and Mike Kelly (R-PA). The bill’s main thrust is expanding the IRS Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (EPCRS) to cover certain errors under individual retirement plans, and providing for reduced penalties for certain self-corrections.

The bill has been referred to the House Ways and Means Committee.  The House of Representatives’ 2019 session resumes on September 9.

Key provisions of H.R. 4117—based on bill text provided by Rep. Kind’s office—include the following.

  • Require the Treasury Department to provide public education materials on IRA contribution and deduction limits, rollovers, required minimum distributions (RMDs), prohibited transactions, the 10 percent early distribution excise tax, and common IRA errors.
  • Reduce the IRA excess contribution penalty from six percent to three percent if corrected within a specified time window.
  • Reduce the penalty for failure to fully distribute an RMD from 50 percent to 10 percent of the undistributed amount if corrected within a specified time window (no reference is made to the existing procedure by which a full waiver of this penalty can be obtained).
  • Exempt earnings withdrawn in a timely IRA excess contribution correction from the 10 percent excise tax on early distributions (which generally applies to those under age 59½)
  • Eliminate the IRA prohibited transaction (PT) consequence of complete IRA disqualification; H.R. 4117 would apply the same rule to HSA, Archer MSA, and Coverdell ESA PTs.
  • Liability for an IRA, HSA, MSA, or ESA PT would be the general 15 percent (primary) and 100 percent (secondary) tax on the PT amount, unless the infraction is a pledging of assets within the account, in which case—while no excise tax—the pledged portion of the account would be deemed distributed and subject to normal taxation consequences.
  • A three-year statute of limitations on PT tax liability would apply.
  • Expand the IRS’s EPCRS program to allow IRA custodians, trustees, and issuers to self-correct errors “for which the owner of an IRA was not at fault;” to include, “but not limited to,” failure to complete a rollover within 60 days, and allow indirect rollover by a nonspouse beneficiary who had reason to believe that due to service provider error, an indirect rollover was permissible.
  • Permit self-correction of “inadvertent” RMD failures in retirement plans (those subject to EPCRS) and IRAs—presuming the existence of practices and procedures designed to prevent such failure—within 180 days; for an IRA owner, “inadvertent” to mean “due to reasonable cause.”
  • The effective date, in general, is as of the date of enactment, with transition provisions; the education elements required of the Treasury Department are to occur “as soon as reasonably practicable after the enactment,” but no later than one year following the date of enactment.