House Passes Legislation to Repeal Cadillac Tax

The U.S. House of Representatives has overwhelmingly passed the Middle Class Health Benefits Tax Repeal Act of 2019 (H.R. 748), which eliminates the so-called “Cadillac tax” element of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act—often referred to simply as the Affordable Care Act, or ACA.

The Cadillac tax was intended to fund certain benefits provided by ACA, and—as some economists claimed it could—exert downward pressure on rising healthcare costs. Application of this tax—40 percent on the value of healthcare benefits exceeding specified thresholds—has been delayed twice by Congress.

The Cadillac tax was to apply to what were claimed to be the most generous and expensive employer-provided healthcare plans. Opponents contended, however, that, in operation, it would have been levied on employer-provided health plans offered to many middle-class workers, and adversely affect employer incentives to offer health benefits. Notably, health benefits included in the calculation to determine application of the Cadillac tax included employer-provided health savings account (HSA) and health reimbursement arrangement (HRA) benefits.

While the 419-6 vote in the House is an indication of broad bipartisan support for repeal of the Cadillac tax, it is unclear at this time when—or whether—the legislation will be taken up in the U.S. Senate in the limited time remaining in the 2019 session of Congress. Repeal cannot occur without the Senate and House passing identical legislation, enacted with President Trump’s signature.